History
 In 1896, Ivy Club purchased a lot on the south side of Prospect Avenue to construct a new Gothic-style clubhouse. The house on the site, formerly the residence of Professor Henry Burchard Fine, Class of 1880, was moved to the north side of Prospect. In 1901, the newly formed Quadrangle Club took over this structure as its first clubhouse.   

Although the architect of the original Fine house is unknown, the structure was built in the late 1880s and was a fine example of the shingle style. Fully sheathed in shingles, it featured a gambrel roof with a variety of gables, porches, and bays. In 1903, however, Quadrangle moved this building back across Prospect Avenue to a site immediately east of Campus Club (where Tower Club stands today) and thoroughly renovated it.

This renovation saw a large wing tacked onto the rear, with a large wraparound porch added to the front and west. The shingle style was maintained, but many of the interesting elements from the original structure were lost. In particular, the facade of the renovated structure eliminated the gables and bays that gave texture to the original Fine house.

Quad remained in the Fine House until 1910, when the club acquired the house that the University had built in 1887 as a retirement home forPresident McCosh and his wife, Isabella. Designed by New York architect A. Page Brown, only 28 at the time, this was a handsome, shingled house in the Colonial Revival style. A number of architectural historians have argued that Brown drew heavily on his design for the Taylor house in Newport, Rhode Island, although the McCosh House is much smaller and not as heavily ornamented.

Unlike many Colonial Revival structures, McCosh House was asymmetrical. A picture of the rear elevation taken after Quad took possession, for example, reveals the curved, off-center dining room with three large windows looking out to the south. This picture also reveals a major alteration undertaken by Quad. A second story was added above the covered piazza on the west end of the building.

 By 1915, Quadrangle determined that the McCosh was not large enough (or grand enough). The following year, it sold the McCosh House to Lloyd Grover, who moved it to its current location on Nassau Street, a block from the intersection with Harrison Street. Quad then commissioned one its board members, Henry Milliken, Class of 1905, to design a new building.

By 1915, Quadrangle determined that the McCosh was not large enough (or grand enough). The following year, it sold the McCosh House to Lloyd Grover, who moved it to its current location on Nassau Street, a block from the intersection with Harrison Street. Quad then commissioned one its board members, Henry Milliken, Class of 1905, to design a new building.

     

 Milliken's plan for Quad called for a classic brick Georgian Revival structure, with the corners defined by white quoins and featuring a large entrance portico. The facade of Milliken's Quad Club is rigidly symmetrical, with eight tall sash windows framing the entrance portico. This portico is the club's most notable feature and was modeled on the entrance to "Westover," one of the great houses of Tidewater Virginia and built in the 1730s.

        

Notable Alumni
  • Ailes, Stephen, Class of 1933. Secretary of the Army (1964 - 1965)
  • Apple, Raymond W. Jr., Class of 1957. Journalist. Associate Editor, The New York Times.
  • Bezos, Jeffrey P., Class of 1986. Entrepreneur, Founder and CEO Amazon.com and Blue Origin, a space flight company; Owner, The Washington Post
  • Billington, David P., Class of 1950, Princeton University Professor of Engineering (1960 - 2010)
  • Bishop, John Peale, Class of 1917. Poet, Writer. Green Fruit, TheUndertaker’s Garland (with Edmond Wilson), Selected Poems (1941)
  • Burt, Robert N., Class of 1959, Chairman and CEO, FMC Corporation (1991 - 2002)
  • Carter, W. Hodding, Class of 1958, President, the Knight Foundation; Assistant Secretary of Public Affairs, U.S. Department of State (1976 - 1980)
  • DeNunzio, Ralph D., Class of 1953. Chairman, President and CEO, Kidder Peabody Company (1953 - 1987); Chairman, Board of Governors, New York Stock Exchange (1971 - 1972)
  • Durst, Sarah Best, Class of 1996. Novelist. ConjuredEnchanted IvyIce, Vessel.
  • Forese, Laura L., Class of 1983, Trustee, Princeton University (2015 - 2023), President, New York-Presbyterian Health Care System
  • Fox, Frederick E., Class of 1939. Pastor. Keeper of Princetoniana and Secretary, Princeton University (1964 -1981); Special Assistant to President Eisenhower 1957 - 1961)
  • Goheen, Robert F., Class of 1940. Ambassador to India, President, Princeton University (1957 - 1972)
  • Gonzalez-Rogers, Yvonne, Class of 1987. Judge, United States District Court for the Northern District of California
  • Harris, F. Allen "Tex", Class of 1960. Diplomat. President, American Foreign Service Association (1993 - 1997); Consul General, South Africa, Australia; Human Rights Officer, Argentina
  • Hillier, J. Robert, Class of 1959. Architect. Founding Partner, Studio Hillier; The Hillier Group (1966 - 2009), Forbes College Annex, Olden House
  • Huebner, David, Class of 1982. Lawyer. Ambassador to Australia, New Zealand & Samoa (2009 - 2014)
  • Loose, Christopher, Class of 2002. Chemical Engineer, Executive Director, Yale University Center for Biological and Interventional Technology
  • Rudenstine, Neil L., Class of 1956. Provost, Princeton University (1977 - 1988); President, Harvard University (1991 - 2001)
  • Shultz, George P. Class of 1942, Director, Office of Management and Budget (1970 - 1972, Secretary of Labor (1969 - 1970) and Treasury (1972 - 1974) and State (1982 - 1989)
  • Stevenson, Adlai E, II., Class of 1922, Governor of Illinois (1949 - 1953), Presidential Candidate 1952, 1956), Ambassador to the United Nations (1961 - 1965)
  • Venturi, Robert, Class of 1947. Architect. Wu Hall, Frist Campus Center Renovation
  • Williams, G. Mennen, Class of 1933. Governor, Michigan (1949 - 1961); Chief Justice of Michigan (1983 - 1987)
  • Wu, Sir Gordon Ying-Sheun, Class of 1958. Philanthropist, Developer. Knight Commander. Trustee, Princeton University, Chairman of the Board, Hopewell Holdings, Ltd.

Quad Today

 

The Princeton Quadrangle Club is one of eleven Princeton University eating clubs, and is located at 33 Prospect Avenue. Founded in 1901 and referred to as “literary Quadrangle” by F. Scott Fitzgerald in This Side of Paradise, present-day Quad is known as one of the most diverse and welcoming clubs in the University.  One of the five “sign-in” clubs, Quad allows any second semester sophomore, junior, or senior to join.   Quad is known for hosting amazing concerts (previous acts include Maroon 5, Rihanna and B.O.B), having the best technology on the Street, and its delicious Soul Food Night.  Most ‘Dranglers consider Quad their home on campus, and can be found within the building’s four corners day and night.